Psychedelic Rock and Self Destruction

| Psychedelic Rock and Self Destruction| Conceptual Framework| | Mallory Jacob Pacheco| 3YR – Aristotle ~ Future Generation Phil. Int’l School| | ABSTRACT This paper describes the conceptual framework that underlies my research paper ‘Psychedelic Rock and Self-Destruction’, whose mission is to measure the psychosocial and behavioral impact of Psychedelic Rock among people.

It also aims to measure what Psychedelic Rock does to the human psyche, and why it causes self-destruction to most people who listen to it and to the people who made or played it, this includes drinking alcohol, taking drugs, smoking, sex, hallucination, high brain activity, being high, and etc. , which causes an early death and self-destruction. Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that is inspired or influenced by psychedelic culture and attempts to replicate and enhance the mind-altering experiences of psychedelic drugs.

It emerged during the mid 1960s among folk rock and blues rock bands in United States and the United Kingdom. It often used new recording techniques and effects and drew on non-Western sources such the ragas and drones of Indian music. Psychedelic rock bridged the transition from early blues- and folk music-based rock to progressive rock, glam rock, hard rock and as a result influenced the development of sub-genres such as heavy metal. Since the late 1970s it has been revived in various forms of neo-psychedelia.

As a musical style psychedelic rock often contains some of the following features: * electric guitars, often used with feedback, wah wah and fuzzboxes; * elaborate studio effects, such as backwards tapes, panning, phasing, long delay loops, and extreme reverb; * exotic instrumentation, with a particular fondness for the sitar and tabla; * a strong keyboard presence, especially organs, harpsichords, or the Mellotron (an early tape-driven ‘sampler’); * a strong emphasis on extended instrumental solos or jams; complex song structures, key and time signature changes, modal melodies and drones; * primitive electronic instruments such as synthesizers and the theremin; * surreal, whimsical, esoterically or literary-inspired, lyrics; In the 1960s, in the tradition of jazz and blues, many folk and rock musicians began to take drugs and included drug references in their songs.

Beat Generation writers like William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and especially the new proponents of consciousness expansion such as Timothy Leary, Alan Watts, Aldous Huxley and Arthur Koestler, profoundly influenced the thinking of the new generation, helping to popularise the use of LSD. Psychedelic music’s LSD-inspired vibe began in the folk scene, with the New York-based Holy Modal Rounders using the term in their 1964 recording of “Hesitation Blues”.

The first group to advertise themselves as psychedelic rock were the 13th Floor Elevators from Texas, at the end of 1965. The term was first used in print in the Austin American Statesman in an article about the band titled “Unique Elevators shine with psychedelic rock”, dated 10 February 1966, and theirs was the first album to use the term as part of its title, in The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators, released in August that year.

After being introduced to cannabis by Bob Dylan, members of the Beatles began experimenting with LSD from 1965 and the group introduced many of the major elements of the psychedelic sound to audiences in this period, with “I Feel Fine” (1964) using guitar feedback; “Norwegian Wood” from their 1965Rubber Soul album using a sitar, and the employment of backwards spooling on their 1966 single B-side “Rain”. Drug references began to appear in their songs from “Day Tripper” (1965) and more explicitly from “Tomorrow Never Knows” (1966) from their 1966 album Revolver.

The Byrds, emerging from the Californian folk scene, and the Yardbirds from the British blues scene, have been seen as particularly influential on the development of the genre. The psychedelic life style had already developed in California, particularly in San Francisco, by the mid-60s, where there was also an emerging music scene. This moved out of acoustic folk-based music towards rock soon after The Byrds “plugged in” to produce a chart topping version of Bob Dylan’s “Tambourine Man” in 1965.

As a number of Californian-based folk acts followed them into folk-rock they brought their psychedelic influences with them to produce the “San Francisco Sound”. Particularly prominent products of the scene were The Grateful Dead, Country Joe and the Fish, The Great Society, Big Brother and the Holding Company, The Charlatans, Moby Grape, Quicksilver Messenger Service and Jefferson Airplane. The Byrds rapidly progressed from purely folk rock in 1966 with their single “Eight Miles High”, which made use of free jazz and Indian ragas and the lyrics of which were widely taken to refer to drug use.

In Britain The Yardbirds, with Jeff Beck as their guitarist, increasingly moved into psychedelic territory, adding up-tempo improvised “rave ups”, Gregorian chant and world music in particular Indian influences to songs including “Still I’m Sad” (1965) and “Over Under Sideways Down” (1966) and singles: “Heart Full of Soul” (1965), “Shapes of Things” (1966) and “Happenings Ten Years Time Ago” (1966). They were soon followed into this territory by bands such as Procol Harum, The Moody Blues and The Nice. EXISTING STUDIES OF PSYCHEDELIC ROCK

Studies of psychedelic rock at the population level is in its early stages of development, and as such, studies on the effectiveness of psychedelic rock suffer from design limitations. Cross-sectional studies, for example, are low in internal validity—that is, they are generally weak in their ability to yield causal attributions. Longitudinal studies are, of course, higher in internal validity, but the limited number of such studies often lack comparison groups, and are thus unable to disentangle effects from secular trends and historical event threats to internal validity.

EVALUATION OF PSYCHEDELIC ROCK AND SELF DESTRUCTION Since at least 1500 B. C. men have, from time to time, held the view that our normal vision of the world is a hallucination—a dream, a figment of the mind, or, to use the Hindu word which means both art and illusion, amaya. The implication is that, if this is so, life need never be taken seriously. It is a fantasy, a play, a drama to be enjoyed. It does not really matter, for one day (perhaps in the moment of death) the illusion will dissolve, and each one of us will awaken to discover that he himself is what there is nd all that there is—the very root and ground of the universe, or the ultimate and eternal space in which things and events come and go. This is not simply an idea which someone “thought up,” like science fiction or a philosophical theory. It is the attempt to express an experience in which consciousness itself, the basic sensation of being “I,” undergoes a remarkable change. We do not know much about these experiences. They are relatively common, and arise in every part of the world. They occur to both children and adults.

They may last for a few seconds and come once in a lifetime, or they may happen repeatedly and constitute a permanent change of consciousness. With baffling impartiality they may descend upon those who never heard of them, as upon those who have spent years trying to cultivate them by some type of discipline. They have been regarded, equally, as a disease of consciousness with symptoms everywhere the same, like measles, and as a vision of higher reality such as comes in moments of scientific or psychological insight.

They may turn people into monsters and megalomaniacs, or transform them into saints and sages. While there is no sure way of inducing these experiences, a favorable atmosphere may be created by intense concentration, by fasting, by sensory deprivation, by hyper-oxygenation, by prolonged emotional stress, by profound relaxation, or by the use of certain drugs. The descriptions in the literature of mystical experience and psychedelic experience, such as that induced by LSD, are usually written by persons who have actually experienced only one or perhaps neither of the two states.

Because many of the most important effects can be understood by direct experience but only partially described in ordinary language, such lack of direct experience is a major drawback. Since there is disagreement over the question of whether mystical experience and LSD experience can be ‘the same’, it would be helpful if an individual who has experienced aspects of both states would compare them. One of the authors (ALS) describes his experience with both states. A particular form of mystical experience, cosmic consciousness (CC), occurred spontaneously; no mind altering drugs were used.

ALS later took LSD on 12-15 occasions. Both states of consciousness involved alterations in time sense, subject/object boundary, cognition, mood and perception. However, the changes with CC were qualitatively and quantitatively different from those of LSD. The authors conclude that CC and LSD can be quite different states of consciousness, although we cannot completely rule out the possibility that psychedelics might sometimes induce the same kinds of mystical experiences that occur for non-drug reasons. So what is it about psychedelic music or any music for that matter that could lead you into the realm of enlightenment?

Music has a profound affect on the human psyche — both the brain and the mind. From before a human is born, to someone well in their 80? s, music stimulates the thinking, analytical, and planning parts of the brain, not to mention, the creativity center! It causes the brain to produce feel-good endorphins and chemicals are released that promote healing. ————————————————- Top of Form Bottom of Form Psychedelic music specifically came from a place of a newfound freedom and experimentation — experimenting with sounds, lyrics, even the length of songs — all had the aim of taking the listener on a ride.

The Beatles came out with one of the first publicly known ‘psychedelic songs’ Lucy in the Sky of Diamonds which featured Eastern spiritual influences, rare instruments and the use of the some of the earliest electronic machines. Stuff to just ‘freak you out, man! ’ Depending on the type of music you listen to, whether it’s the guitar-ripping of Jimi Hendrix to the classical symphonies of Beethoven, music can take you to a place of complete inner solitude, fill you with the sense of oneness between you and the world and is an excellent way to deepen your spiritual journey.

Psychedelic rock music has taken on a (some would say aptly) nebulous identity since those halcyon days of the Summer of Love, where love was free and LSD was legal. Of course everyone knows what psych IS; every single pop artist of the Sixties took a detour into its murky yet somehow alluring depths during the genre’s 1966-1968 heyday, even if most of these acts only stuck around at the party for the space of an album or so. Still, when psych fiends sit around and talk about the music, it’s not the Beatles or even Pink Floyd that get discussed so much.

No, our definition of psychdelia, like Julian’s, hinges on teenagers banging out aggressive, worldly-yet-innocent freakouts that utilized what some saw as the mind-expanding qualities of certain illegal drugs and the DIY proto-punk aesthetic of the garage. Like rockabilly before it and punk after it, most of these groups went nearly unnoticed in their time, scoring maybe one minor hit if lucky and then fading out after another handful of 45s. But rock and roll, lest we forget, thrives on just such a pioneer spirit.

And that never changes, even if the psychedelic movement may have made America look less like itself than ever before. THE 27 CLUB In life, there are certain questions that will be left unanswered and mysteries that will remain unsolved. Such is the case with a group of young, legendary musicians whose tragic deaths spawned what is known as the “27 Club. ” The 27 Club, also known as Club 27 or Forever 27 Club, is a name given to a group of notable musicians who died at the young age of 27. Their deaths during this ripe age are either known or shrouded in mystery. Influential musicians included on this list are: Kurt Cobain (February 20, 1967 – April 5, 1994) – Guitarist, singer-songwriter and lead singer of Nirvana, committed suicide by shooting himself with a shotgun * Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) – Singer-songwriter and guitarist, cause of death was sleeping pill overdose * Robert Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) – Blues musician, cause of death is unknown * Brian Jones (February 28, 1942 – July 3, 1969) – Guitarist and founding member of The Rolling Stones, cause of death was drowning * Janis Joplin (January 19, 1943 – 4 October 1970) – Singer-songwriter and lead singer of Big Brother and the Holding Company, probable cause of death was heroin overdose * Jim Morrison (December 8, 1943 – July 3, 1971) – Singer-songwriter and lyricist of The Doors, cause of death listed as heart failure although others suspect it was due to heroin overdose CONCLUSION This is not simply an idea which someone “thought up,” like science fiction or a philosophical theory. It is the attempt to express an experience in which consciousness itself, the basic sensation of being “I,” undergoes a remarkable change. We do not know much about these experiences. They are relatively common, and arise in every part of the world. They occur to both children and adults. They may last for a few seconds and come once in a lifetime, or they may happen repeatedly and constitute a permanent change of consciousness.

With baffling impartiality they may descend upon those who never heard of them, as upon those who have spent years trying to cultivate them by some type of discipline. They have been regarded, equally, as a disease of consciousness with symptoms everywhere the same, like measles, and as a vision of higher reality such as comes in moments of scientific or psychological insight. They may turn people into monsters and megalomaniacs, or transform them into saints and sages. While there is no sure way of inducing these experiences, a favorable atmosphere may be created by intense concentration, by fasting, by sensory deprivation, by hyper-oxygenation, by prolonged emotional stress, by profound relaxation, or by the use of certain drugs.

October 1, 2017